WikiLeaks – Cuba Banned ‘Sicko’ Due to Mythical Depiction of its Health Care System

posted by Nima

December 18, 2010 · Posted in General Economics 

Not that this should be a surprise to anyone, but those who still for some reason confuse the emotional and biased hogwash that Michael Moore has been coming up with lately with journalism, might want to consider what Cubans have to say about his depictions of Cuba’s oh so wonderful health care system:

Castro’s government apparently went on to ban the film because, the leaked cable claims, it “knows the film is a myth and does not want to risk a popular backlash by showing to Cubans facilities that are clearly not available to the vast majority of them.”

(…)

The cable describes a visit made by the FSHP to the Hermanos Ameijeiras hospital in October 2007. Built in 1982, the newly renovated hospital was used in Michael Moore’s film as evidence of the high-quality of healthcare available to all Cubans.

But according to the FSHP, the only way a Cuban can get access to the hospital is through a bribe or contacts inside the hospital administration. “Cubans are reportedly very resentful that the best hospital in Havana is ‘off-limits’ to them,” the memo reveals.

According to the FSHP, a more “accurate” view of the healthcare experience of Cubans can be seen at the Calixto Garcia Hospital. “FSHP believes that if Michael Moore really wanted the ’same care as local Cubans’, this is where he should have gone,” the cable states.

A 2007 visit by the FSHP to this “dilapidated” hospital, built in the 1800s, was “reminiscent of a scene from some of the poorest countries in the world,” the cable adds.

The memo points out that even the Cuban ruling elite leave Cuba when they need medical care. Fidel Castro, for example, brought in a Spanish doctor during his health crisis in 2006. The vice-minister of health, Abelardo Ramirez, went to France for gastric cancer surgery. The neurosurgeon whoheads CIMEQ [Centro de Investigaciones Médico-Quirúrgicas] hospital – widely regarded as one of the best in Cuba – came to England for eye surgery, returning periodically for checkups.

“After living in Cuba for two and a half years, treating numerous Cuban employees at USINT, and interacting with many other Cubans, the FSHP believes … preventive medicine in Cuba is a by-gone ideal, rather than the standard practice of care,” the memo concludes.

In a system of central planning with no recognition of property rights where bureaucracy reigns supreme, misallocations always and inevitably lead to shortages. And shortages always necessitate compulsory rationing and bribery.

This is, by the way, exactly the direction that health care in the US has been taking for the past decades and continues to accelerate towards full throttle.

It takes the delusion of bigoted socialist ideology to look past such simple and obvious realities.

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