Consumer Prices September 2009 – Real Prices Down 4.7%

The BLS reported yesterday:

On a seasonally adjusted basis, the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) rose 0.2 percent in September, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The increase was less than the 0.4 percent rise in August. The index has decreased 1.3 percent over the last 12 months on a not seasonally adjusted basis.

The seasonally adjusted increase in the all items index was broad based, although tempered by a decline in the food index. The all items less food and energy index increased 0.2 percent in September after increasing 0.1 percent in each of the previous two months. Contributing to this increase were advances in the indexes for lodging away from home, medical care, new vehicles, used cars and trucks, and public transportation. The increase occurred despite declines in the indexes for rent and owners’ equivalent rent, the first decreases in those indexes since 1992. The energy index also increased in September, as increases in the indexes for gasoline, fuel oil and electricity more than offset a decline in the index for natural gas.

In contrast to these increases, the food index declined, falling for the sixth time in the last eight months. The index for food away from home increased, but the food at home index declined as the indexes for fruits and vegetables and for meats, poultry, fish and eggs fell sharply. Both the food and energy indexes have declined over the past 12 months. The decline in the food index is the first 12-month decrease in that index in over 40 years.

Note that there are a lot of  “first time in x years” declines in the report above.

And what about real prices, meaning prices where the unrealisic owner’s equivalent rent is replaced with the decline in the case shiller (most recently 12.76%) index? If we make that adjustment, real annual price declines were actually -4.7%.

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Consumer Price Index August 2009 – Real Prices Down 5.61 Percent

The BLS reports:

On a seasonally adjusted basis, the Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers (CPI-U) rose 0.4 percent in August, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The index has decreased 1.5 percent over the last 12 months on a not seasonally adjusted basis.

The 0.4 percent seasonally adjusted increase in the CPI-U was driven by a 9.1 percent rise in the gasoline index. This increase accounted for almost the entire advance in the energy index and over 80 percent of the overall increase. Despite the August increase, the gasoline index has fallen 30.0 percent over the last 12 months.

Actually, not seasonally adjusted (which I always look at for almost all my data), prices declined by 1.5% from 1 year ago. And as always, we need to replace OER (Owners Equivalent Rent) with the latest home price declines as per the Case-Shiller index of 15.13%. When we do that, we get a real price decline of 5.61% from one year ago.

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Consumer Price Index July 2009 – Real Prices Down 6.6%

The BLS reports CPI data for July 2009:

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) decreased 0.2 percent in July before seasonal adjustment, the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor reported today. Over the last 12 months the index has fallen 2.1 percent, as a 28.1 percent decline in the energy index since its July 2008 peak has more than offset increases of 0.9 percent in the food index and 1.5 percent in the index for all items less food and energy.

The official price decline over the past 12 months was 2.1 percent. That alone is unprecedented as far as I can tell. But let’s, as always, approximate real price declines:

Looking at the detailed table, one can see that owner’s equivalent rent (OER) went up by 1.7%. If we want to calculate the True CPI, we have to replace OER with the Case Shiller home price index, which most recently dropped by 16.8% over the year. If we do this, we get an overall price decline from 1 Year ago of 6.6%. (Last month’s release yielded a real price decline of 6.4%)

Not only are prices falling, they are falling at an accelerating pace. This a corollary effect of deflation, plain and simple. Some investors say we should expect inflation soon. Some expect it somewhere down the road and that it will me rampant. Most of them don’t dare use the D word, even though by all unconventional AND unconventional measures we are in the very midst of a massive deflation, not based on prices alone, most definitely not based on money supply alone, but first and foremost due to an ongoing and likely long lasting credit contraction:

total-credit-long-term
Click on image to enlarge.

Since the peak in October 2008, total credit and loans/leases outstanding have fallen by $725 billion, a 4.3% drop. And this doesn’t even take into account the decline in outstanding bond prices and unfunded liabilities. It is, indeed, tough to ascertain whether there is a decline in the net present value of unfunded liabilities. Thus we shall ignore them for now. However, bond prices have definitely declined across the board.

If we conservatively assume, for the sake of simplicity, that those bonds have contracted by about the same percentage since October 2008, this would give us a total credit contraction of around $2.15 trillion since the peak.

[smartads] On top of that, I don’t think that people are oblivious to the fact that there is absolutely no way that all social security and medicare benefits will ever be paid. Thus it would only be reasonable to conservatively assume that the present value of those liabilities has dropped by the same amount. This would almost double the total contraction to $4 trillion.

It is, on top of that, rather questionable whether all this credit is marked to market. I would say that all this number gives us at the moment is at the low end of the range. Meanwhile, the true money supply since then has grown by merely $170 billion.

Why is this so important? Because it shows us the magnitude of the deflation that we are in right now, a deflation with all its consequences on home prices, consumer prices, interest rates, and stock prices. And it gives us a solid foundation to understand why various investors and maintream journalists who continue to expect, fear, or hope for inflation anytime soon are way off base and will be proven wrong in the long run.

As far as a general mid-term trend one can expect based on this data, as far as certain asset classes are concerned:
Bullish: Treasurys, Dollar, Gold, (maybe) Silver
Bearish: Stocks, Corporate Bonds, Foreign Currencies (except for the Yen maybe), Soft Commodities

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Consumer Price Index June 09 – Real Prices Down 6.4%

The BLS reports:

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased 0.9 percent in June before seasonal adjustment, the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor reported today. Over the last 12 months the index has fallen 1.4 percent, as a 25.5 percent decline in the energy index has more than offset increases of 2.1 percent in the food index and 1.7 percent in the index for all items less food and energy.

Looking at the detailed table, one can see that owner’s equivalent rent (OER) went up by 1.9%. If we want to calculate the True CPI, we have to replace OER with the Case Shiller home price index, which most recently dropped by 18.1% over the year. If we do this, we get an overall price decline from 1 Year ago of 6.4%. (Last month’s release yielded a real price decline of 6.3%)

Deflation is alive and well … and accelerating.

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